Health Sherpa. Look up Obamacare plans by zipcode

thehealthsherpa.com

The Health Sherpa makes it easy to look up what Obamacare plans are available to you. Just enter your zip code to see all the plans. You can also display the individual categories of bronze, silver, gold, and platinum. If you are low-income be sure to enter your income to see what subsidy you qualify for. For example, a family of two making $30,000 can get a substantial subsidy of several hundred a month, which can make the policies quite affordable.

The Health Sherpa is not a government site. It was created by three coders in San Francisco who wanted to make it easy for people to research plans. They have performed a huge public service. After you find a plan you like, sign up on healthcare.gov, where it really seems like they’ve gotten the bugs fixed.

Sebelius orders investigation in Healthcare.gov failures

Keystone

Um, shouldn’t the investigation have been ordered in early October, when it was already clear healthcare.gov had massive problems and not just before HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius’ appearance before a hostile House committee?

I’d like to know why a third tier company, CGI Federal, was given a no-bid contract, after they’d failed building a similar heathcare website for Canada, and why other contractors also got no-bid contracts.

I’m a software developer. 10 percent of Healthcare.gov applications currently sent to insurers have errors, down from 25% in October. This is beyond unacceptable. An invoicing system where 10% of the invoices had errors would be a train wreck. An error rate this high means all applications have to be manually re-checked to insure they are accurate. Sending data to another computer is not complicated or rocket science. It’s difficult to understand how it got so screwed up.

Questions also remain about the accuracy of application files that insurers are receiving from HealthCare.gov and state-run health insurance exchanges. After weeks of media scrutiny, the administration last week said about 10 percent of the application files, known as the “834” files, sent to insurers currently contain erroneous information – down from about 25 percent in October.

Healthcare.gov still faces problems. Administration in denial

Pinocchio

The Obama Administration needs to get honest about healthcare.gov instead of making perky comments then immediately backtracking. Crucial back-end functions still aren’t done. Without a functioning back-end,  touting front-end improvements is meaningless.

The back-end is dysfunctional at best. The Administration keeps trying to spin this like it’s just a pesky PR image problem. Yet, by their own admission, healthcare.gov still can’t properly process enrollments. Thus, it remains broken. Feeble lies and deliberate evasions by federal officials simply make a bad situation worse.

Federal officials said they had largely succeeded in repairing parts of the site that had most snarled users in the two months since its troubled launch, but acknowledged they only had begun to make headway on the biggest underlying problems: the system’s ability to verify users’ identities and accurately transmit enrollment data to insurers.

The front-end is still inadequate.

Administration officials concede that the site still may not be able to handle the crush of people expected to seek insurance this month

Healthcare.gov nowhere near being fixed

Healthcare-Gov-borked

Obama said healthcare.gov would have 80% functionality by today, yet 30-40% of crucial back-end work remains to be done. We need a full investigation as to why a third-tier consulting company in Canada got this no-bid contract, especially since they’d already botched a similar health care website in Canada.

Technicians are still working on the back-end functions of the site, or the portion that makes sure insurers get their checks when people who will receive subsidies enroll. As of last week, 30% to 40% of that work remained to be done.

This is pathetic. Despite perky assessments from Team Obama, if the back-end is nowhere near completion then neither is the website.

Healthcare.gov is not secure, has 25x more code than Facebook

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Dear God, healthcare.gov is so stupidly coded it tells you if your user name is invalid, violating basic security precautions. Some security experts say it should be shut down until it’s fixed. If the site gets hacked and data is stolen, results will be catastrophic.

The site lets people know invalid user names when logging in, allowing hackers to identify user IDs, according to the report.

If someone enters an invalid login name or password, the system should say “invalid login” without giving details as to which one was wrong. Why give hackers information they can use, like telling them if a username is valid?

Healthcare.gov has 25x more code than Facebook? Are the contractors paid by the line? This is complete insanity.

The experts said the site needed to be completely rebuilt to run more efficiently, making it easier to protect. They said HealthCare.gov runs on 500 million lines of code, or 25 times the size of Facebook, one of the world’s busiest sites.