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Political violence is a game the Right can’t win, says a rightie

David Hines, a committed member of the right, says political violence, fighting in the streets, is a game the right won’t win because the left are way better at organizing and because, essentially, the culture and media are more sympathetic to left views. Yes, there’s Fox News, however look at what Hollywood says and implies. It’s not a right wing viewpoint. Plus, I would add, the left, via masses of apparatchiks, has control on way more levers of power than the right.

If there’s one thing righties believe, it’s that they could beat lefties in a fight.

You see this attitude reflected over and over again, to the point that it’s probably something engrained in the right-wing psyche. Pajama Boy vs. tactical deathbeast? Pffft. No contest. Look, righties have the guns, righties have police and they have the military. If one day the balloon ever goes up, righties will just organize behind a leadership of their veterans, coordinate with the active service, give all the lefties free helicopter rides, and live happily ever after. Right?

That’s pretty much what the Confederacy thought about the Yankees, and it didn’t exactly work out well for them.

Unlike many on the right, Hines studies the left, says the tactics and strategy used by the left are smart, and finds laughable, as does anyone on the left, that Soros is secretly financing us. If only…

He is genuinely concerned, as am I, that we could spiral into serious violence. (Read his Storify for more on this.) Which would not be grand and glorious as we righteously smite the enemy. Instead it would be blood in the streets, injuries, trauma, death, and your side might lose so then you get tortured. Woo hoo. Sign me up. “Dig, the time is right for palace revolution, but where I live the game to play is compromise solution” said  the Stones in “Street Fighting Man”, and that’s still good advice.

Political violence isn’t fun for the whole family: it’s long, and it’s ugly, and everybody suffers. And nobody ever thinks this when they have a Great Cause, but maybe, just maybe, your Great Cause won’t win. And then what? “It couldn’t be worse” is the sort of thing Turkish coup plotters say right before their attempt fails and leaves their bete noire in undisputed charge of writing the purge lists.

I have spent time on the far left, helped organize sometime huge protests, and agree with what he says about the strengths of the left.

The organizational capacity required to build a new world is the same organizational capacity have Lefties built to pressure government. So who’s in a better position to shape the big moment when it comes? Hell, if tomorrow civilization goes completely Mad Max: who’s got existing local networks of people who they’re used to turning out and doing stuff with on a regular basis? Answer to both questions: not the Right.

The first thing righties have to understand about Lefties is that lefties have a lot more practice building their own institutions, and assuming control of existing institutions, than their counterparts on the right do, and they share their practical experience with each other.

The second thing to understand about Lefties is how they actually function. There’s a lot of independence involved. Righties like hierarchy, so often think of the Lefties as taking marching orders from George Soros or whoever in a very hierarchical fashion. Not so much. A lot of left-wing organization is very decentralized, and they negotiate with other lefty groups as to exactly how they’ll do things and time things to not hurt each others’ work.

Lefties are excellent at protests, not because they pay seat-fillers, but because they’ve professionalized organizing them, as you’ll discover if you read any of their books. The protesters aren’t paid. The organizers are paid. The people who train the organizers and protesters are paid.

Shipping container farms for locally-grown produce

cropbox

Produce can now be grown hydroponically with LEDs in completely self-contained Freight Farms or Cropbox shipping container farms, controllable from by smart phone. Crops include lettuce, kale, chard, arugula, herbs, and other small vegetables. Cropbox can also be used for microgreens and feed for horses, with a strawberry version coming soon. Both use dramatically less water than conventional growing, can be put anywhere including big cities , and are stackable. Also, LEDs produce practically no heat, greatly reducing cooling expenses, as compared to halogen.

Thus, a restaurant could grow produce in their parking lot and bring it directly to the tables, the ultimate in locally grown food. Or containers could be stacked several high in urban warehouses and supply many restaurants and farmer’s markets.

Cropbox claims that their systems also use up to 90 percent less water than traditional growing methods. For lighting they used LED lights, which keep the energy expenditure to a minimum. There is space to grow 3,000 plants in one of their containers.

The Freight Farms shipping container farm features separate spaces for different stages of plant growth, such as seedling and germination area, which is large enough to support 2,500 plants. They also have 256 vertical towers which offer enough space for more than 4,500 mature plants.

Market share of hybrid cars falls, market share is tiny

hybrid-car-market-share

Even with increasing numbers of hybrid models on the market, 47 in the US, market share for hybrids is falling and is now at a minuscule 3%. It may be that hybrids won’t ever be more than niche vehicles.

I am the original owner of a 2001 Toyota Prius. It’s been a great car and I’ll drive it until the wheels fall off. The electric motor battery needed replacement at 105,000 miles and was just out of warranty so it cost $2,700. Other than that, there’s been nothing but routine maintenance.

Technological improvements in gas, diesel, plug-in hybrids, and EVs have eroded the MGP advantage of hybrids, which probably accounts for the decline in sales. Everyone else has caught up with hybrids. 45 MPG isn’t that big a deal now.

Hybrid cars have always been seen as “transitional” vehicles, and I’m certainly not ready to say the market has already moved past them. But now that there are more options in the diesel, EV, and compact market that appeal to MPG fanatics, the glossy sheen of hybrid cars may be finally wearing off.

Toyota iRoad. Getting home after using public transport

Toyota-iRoad

Public transportation is a great idea. Sometimes though, you may live a few miles from the stop. Why drive a car when you can drive an iRoad? This is the niche Toyota wants to fill.

The iRoad is similiar to a motorcycle, offers protection from the elements, and has an electric engine. Plus it could be shared, like in bike sharing programs now. It’s being tested in Toyota City in Japan and soon in France.

Walmart experimental WAVE truck is energy efficient

Walmart-Wave-truck

Walmart, love them or hate them, is a leader in energy efficiency and reducing waste. They do this because it saves money. Their new WAVE truck (Walmart Advanced Vehicle Experience) weighs two tons less than comparable semis, has superb aerodynamics, and a turbine engine. They want to double big rig MPG to 10, saving potentially $25,000 per year per truck. They have 6,500 big rigs in their fleet so the potential savings is $162,5000 a year (plus a whole lot less pollutants in the air.)

The Walmart Advanced Vehicle Experience, or WAVE, concept truck is the latest in our fleet efficiency program. The one-of-a-kind prototype offers a whole package of firsts. The tractor has very advanced aerodynamics and is powered by a prototype advanced turbine-powered, range-extending series hybrid powertrain. The trailer is made almost exclusively with carbon fiber, saving around 4,000 pounds which can then be used to carry more freight.