category

Archive | Solar power

Solar-powered wi-fi

The Lumin solar-powered access point is highly portable, installs easily anywhere, and needs just 5 hours of sun a day to run for 24 hours. It is specifically meant to operate in areas with no electricity.

Each solar-paneled access point can relay wireless signals as far as 25 miles to other stations and can connect to a series of other nodes, extending the signal from the cities to rural areas.

And they’re working on the Holy Grail.

A model linking solar panels with satellites is in the works.

DailyWireless has more.

HT Social Design Notes.

Solar pay and display parking meters

This type of parking meter prints out a ticket you put on the dashboard. They are solar-powered and work on ambient light. Thus, no expensive underground cabling needs to be run to power them.

A primary reason for pay and display meters, is that another car can’t use your time if you leave with time remaining on the meter. Also, one machine can service hundreds of parking spaces.

More on solar power towers

EnviroMission is planning “world’s first large-scale solar thermal power station” which will generate a whopping 200MW. Their website has a useful animation about this type of tower works. It’s quite simple, low maintenance, and totally passive. All that’s needed is sun, a large tower with a turbine in it, and acres of transparent sheeting.

Another type of much more complicated solar towers, have been tested in Barstow. They use mirrors to reflect the sun to heat water, sometimes using “used molten salt, a combination of 60% NaNO3 and 40% KNO3, as an energy storage medium.”

Solar powered subdivision in Arizona…

Solar powered subdivision in Arizona – off the grid!

What is thought to be the nation’s first subdivision powered by solar energy and propane, a community of 487 houses that won’t be connected to the electrical power grid, east of Kingman <Arizona>
GreenWood Ranch Estates will offer modular homes on 5-acre lots. Each will be equipped to generate electricity by harnessing the 320 days of sunlight the area receives annually.
“I would tend to believe this is unique in terms of that number of homes,” said Byron Stafford, solar engineer with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colo., a part of the U.S. Department of Energy. “There are other subdivisions (in California) where solar is an option, but the homes are not grid-independent.”