Switching from Firefox to Chrome. Chrome is faster, more stable



I’ve switched to Chrome because Firefox has crippling problems. Chrome is faster, way more stable, and doesn’t hog the CPU. Videos that were slow and jerky using Firefox are fine with Chrome. I thought a flaky net feed was the problem but it was Firefox.

Here’s what happened. When Norton Internet Security started reporting that the Firefox plugin manager on my laptop was using 100% of CPU time, I knew something was seriously wrong with Firefox. This happened several times after the upgrade to the new version of Firefox. It wasn’t a spurious report. The fan on the computer was whirring furiously, and the computer was sluggish. Shutting down Firefox put CPU usage back to normal. I tried de-installing all unneeded plugins, and that helped a little. But an app that uses 100% of CPU is simply not acceptable, and clearly has something major that is broken. Firefox says they know it has memory leaks but don’t know what’s causing it. As a database programmer, I’d say the problem might be more that they’ve coded themselves into a corner and fixing the leaks would be a major rewrite

The switch to Chrome has been remarkably easy. While Firefox does have more plugins, most of the important ones also exist as extensions on Chrome. I can sync bookmarks to other Chrome browsers, use the Stumbleupon toolbar, delete Flash cookies, and make GMail the default mail client.

I hope Firefox can fix the problems.

Firefox Sync makes excellent replacement for Xmarks

Xmarks, a browser sync service with two million users is shutting down in Jan. 2011. They recommend a number of alternatives, including Firefox Sync, which I’m using now. It too will sync bookmarks between multiple browsers as well as passwords, and also saves history and tabs. Yes, tabs.

The Firefox Home app on the iPhone is the companion app Firefox Sync. You can access all your bookmarks and open tabs as well. Nice. Both are free and by Mozilla. Sync will be built-in with future versions of Firefox.