Fundrace.org

Fundrace.org


How much are your neighbors ponying up to get cozy with Bush and/or Kerry? Check it out here!


You can look up donors by zip code, view city maps of donors, and lots more.


One quibble. The maps are, well, snobby. The L.A. map doesn’t include the San Fernando Valley, which has over two million people in it (yet ANOTHER insult for those of us who live in the Valley and who are routinely slimed by those who don’t; well we are MAD AS HELL and aren’t going to take it anymore) while the NYC map only shows donors in Manhattan (what, The Bronx, Brooklyn, Queens, and Staten Island are chopped liver?)



All in all, an amazing resource and a spectacular piece of computer programming.


LA Voice details Los Angeles donors.

There are lies, damn lies,…

There are lies, damn lies, and statistics


Unemployed dropping out of labor pool 



If those people who want jobs but aren’t looking were counted, the unemployment rate would be more than 7 percent, said Mark Zandi, chief economist at Economy.com.


Got that? If you stop looking for a job, you are no longer counted as unemployed. Instead, you no longer exist. And how can they determine who has stopped looking for a job?

*


Courtney Love does the math


I just discovered this, it’s from 2000, but still instructive as to how the music business works. Let Courtney explain.



This story is about a bidding-war band that gets a huge deal with a 20 percent royalty rate and a million-dollar advance


What happens? If the band is lucky, they maybe keep $45,000 a year each out of that one mil to live on while recording the album.


And if they really luck out and sell a million copies?



If all of the million records are sold at full price with no discounts or record clubs, the band earns $2 million in royalties, since their 20 percent royalty works out to $2 a record.


Two million dollars in royalties minus $2 million in recoupable expenses equals … zero!


How much does the record company make?


Their profit is $6.6 million; the band may as well be working at a 7-Eleven.


She’s right, y’know. There’s that story about Van Halen, they made it big, did a huge world tour, sold a zillion copies, got back home and found they were millions in debt to the record company. It took them years to pay it off.