Podcast: Juan Jose Gutierrez. Immigrant Rights Movement

Juan Jose Gutierrez of Latino Movement USA details the birth and growth of the immigrant rights movement starting in 1968, continuing through the amnesty (signed by Reagan!) in 1986, to the huge, historic marches of March 25 and May 1 of this year.

Gutierrez was a major organizer of the massive anti-Prop 187 march in California in 1994, and played a leading role in organizing for March 25 and May 1. He discusses the history, the various groups involved, and where the movement is going, with a perspective and knowledge that comes from 38 years of organizing.

Recorded at an ANSWER LA Forum, 6/23/06

MP3 (54:28 min, 18.2 MB)

[tags]Juan Jose Gutierrez[/tags]

  • M. Summer

    Mr. Gutierrez is upset with President Bush because he changed his mind on immigration? Not true – the American PEOPLE changed his mind on immigration. And its about time!!

  • Jill

    These people are NOT immigrants. They are ILLEGAL ALIENS. There is a huge difference. They are NOT in the same category AT ALL. You can not go into any other country, including Mexico, without documentation and live, work and go to school there. The US has been too good to these illegals, and that is why they think they can DEMAND more. It’s insane. And the insanity has to stop NOW! Juan Jose Gutierrez is a sick, manipulative moron! He needs to stop exploiting the US citizens and their tax dollars and go back to Mexico. Mexico was paid extremely well for the southwest territories it sold off because of its constant financial problems. Some things don’t change! Gutierrez must stop lying and trying to manipulate the system to his advantage. It will NOT work. Take your ILLEGAL butt and go home already. We are sick and tried of Juan Jose Gutierrez!

  • Hey Jill, at least try to get your facts correct before spouting off.

    Juan Jose was born in the USA.

  • DJ

    If the U.S. had the same policies as, for example, Mexico, few of us would be here. Let’s not forget that most of us decend from people who fled their homelands for a better life in the U.S., some legally (like my French-Canadian grandmother’s family) and some illegally (like my Irish grandfather, who overstayed his visa by 50 years).

    Two of my grandparents descend from ancestors who arrived in this country before there was a country, but most of us don’t. We are a nation of immigrants, and probably always will be.

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